Photoset

feliscorvus:

starry-eyed-wolfchild:

Bee Hotels for Solitary Bees

You may be wondering what bees need a hotel for, when they make their own hives. The truth is that many species of bees are solitary – the do not live in hives but instead construct their own nest. The main reason for this is because in these species every female is fertile and this would not make for comfortable communal living in a hive.

Eeeeee! That is the cutest bee face I have ever seen poking out there like “you rang?”

(Source: arkinspace.com, via tlapalizquixochtzin)

Photoset

(Source: 1andonlykys, via visovari)

Text

ossricchau:

jack the ripper has been identified after 126 years, and if you don’t think that’s the coolest shit- you’re wrong.

(via nosherlockdasgay)

Text

moose-of-many:

Lending your phone to your friend likeimage

(via dsm144)

Photoset
Photoset

(Source: tsuyuake, via yatosa)

Photoset

thewritersramblings:

bioshock infinite + textposts

(via lecterings)

Photoset

hyggehaven:

Chinampa (Nahuatlchināmitl [tʃiˈnaːmitɬ]) is a method of ancient Mesoamerican agriculture which used small, rectangular areas of fertile arable land to grow crops on the shallow lake beds in the Valley of Mexico.

Sometimes referred to as “floating gardens,” chinampas were artificial islands that usually measured roughly 98 ft × 8.2 ft (30 m × 2.5 m).[1] Chinampas were used by the ancient Aztec [Aboriginal Peoples].[2] In Tenochtitlan, the chinampas ranged from 300 ft × 15 ft (91 m × 4.6 m)[1] to 300 ft × 30 ft (91 m × 9.1 m)[1][3] They were created by staking out the shallow lake bed and then fencing in the rectangle with wattle. The fenced-off area was then layered with mud, lake sediment, and decaying vegetation, eventually bringing it above the level of the lake. Often trees such as āhuexōtl [aːˈweːʃoːt͡ɬ] (Salix bonplandiana)[2] (a willow) and āhuēhuētl [aːˈweːweːt͡ɬ] (Taxodium mucronatum)[4] (a cypress) were planted at the corners to secure the chinampa. Chinampas were separated by channels wide enough for a canoe to pass. These “islands” had very high crop yields with up to 7 crops a year.[5]

photo:  Iraun permakultura (1), Aztec Chinampas model by Te Mahi, Photographer: Te Papa, © Te Papa (2)

(via tlapalizquixochtzin)

Photoset

last one, i mean it (1&2)

(via lecterings)

Photoset

(Source: grand-piano, via greenteaduck)